Category Archives: Shows

#29 – Clark Vogeler of Toadies – Feeler

Clark Vogeler and Toadies

The Toadies had a monster hit in 1995 with “Possum Kingdom.”  The parent album, Rubberneck, sold a million copies…then the band disappeared.  Actually, they recorded a follow up, Feeler, which the record company rejected, killing the band’s momentum and sending them back to the drawing board.  They eventually broke up in 2001.  After a successful reunion album, No Deliverance, in 2006, they’ve decided to revisit the old songs from 13 years ago; the songs that were inexplicably seen unfit to release.  Click below to hear the Clark Vogeler Toadies interview.

#28 – Jim Wolf – Sleeping With Strangers

Jim Wolf

Singer/songwriter Jim Wolf’s debut, Sleeping With Strangers, is a concept album of sorts; it chronicles a relationship, start to finish, from the budding romance, commitment, and finally, breakup and recovery.  Wolf used a total of seven different studios in the process, taking several years to complete.  The Connecticut native talks with Icon Fetch about the girl behind the songs, the experience of moving to NYC, and shrugging off the comparisons to John Mayer, who is from the same hometown, and who also played in a high school band with Wolf’s older brother.  Click below for the Jim Wolf interview.

#27 – Rex Brown of Pantera – Cowboys From Hell Remastered

Rex Brown Pantera

It’s been 20 years since the release of Pantera’s landmark “Cowboys From Hell.” To celebrate, they’ve put together a deluxe 3-disc collection, featuring the entire album remastered, a disc of demos and a third disc of live material, recorded during the ensuing tour.  But, the real treat of the collection is an unreleased Pantera song called “The Will To Survive.”  Icon Fetch catches up with former Pantera bassist Rex Brown and gets his thoughts on the new set, and it’s place in metal history.  He also gives his reflections on the loss of bandmate “Dimebag” Darrell, and updates us on his new project, Arms of the Sun.  Click below for the Rex Brown Pantera interview.

 

#26 – Sarah Vonderhaar – P.D.L. (Pretty Damn Lucky)

Sarah Vonderhaar
She was part of the reality series “America’s Next Top Model” on the CW back in 2007.  Chicago native Sarah Vonderhaar is also a singer/songwriter, who has released a brand new digital-only EP called P.D.L. (Pretty Damn Lucky). One of the highlights is “Howling at the Moon” which has a real classic pop sound to it.  Vonderhaar talks about the drama that surrounded the TV show, her custom-made Fender guitar, and how she’s a self-admitted “goof.”  Click below for the Sarah Vonderhaar interview.

#25 – Richard Barone – Glow

Richard Barone

Richard Barone fronted the new wave band the Bongos in the early eighties, then went on to a critically-acclaimed solo career, which Rolling Stone dubbed “chamber pop.”  He took several years off to work on projects for other people.  He also wrote a book called Frontman – Surviving the Rock n’ Roll Myth.  Now, he’s set to release his first studio album in 16 years, Glow.  Icon Fetch talks with Barone about working with legendary producer Tony Visconti (David Bowie, T.Rex), his new toy – the Digital Les Paul, and writing songs with legendary tunesmith Paul Williams.  Click below for the Richard Barone interview.

#24 – Teeny Tucker – Keep the Blues Alive

Teeny Tucker

Teeny Tucker’s dad was the famous bluesman Tommy Tucker, who had a hit with “Hi Heeled Sneakers” back in 1964.  Teeny, who stands only 5’1″, is continuing in her father’s tradition with her new release, Keep the Blues Alive. She talks with Icon Fetch about her new CD, her writing process and the true story behind the song “Old Man Magnet.”  Click below for the Teeny Tucker interview.

#23 – Antonia Bennett – Natural

Antonia Bennett

She is the youngest daughter of Tony Bennett, Antonia Bennett has just released her debut EP called Natural.  Not surprisingly, the material is very reminiscent of her dad’s classic, piano-dominated sound.  Yet, she’s also no clone of her parent either.  Antonia’s voice is, at times, playful, and others, sultry, showing off a unique, interpretive quality befitting of her pedigree.  She’s currently touring the world, opening shows for her father.  Icon Fetch talks Ms. Bennett about following in her dad’s footsteps, playing the famed Royal Albert Hall, and having to sing the “Hokey Pokey” on stage as a kid.  Click below for the Antonia Bennett interview. 

#22 – Ray Charles Jr. – You Don’t Know Me

Ray Charles Jr.
He is the son of Ray Charles, yet for most of his early life, his dad was not around; constantly out on the road.  Ray Charles Jr. has just written the book “You Don’t Know Me,” which delves deeper into the story of his father than the movie “Ray” ever did.  He talks candidly about how his dad’s transgressions had a lasting impact on he and his brothers, and how despite seeing firsthand the dangers of drug abuse, he traveled down that very same destructive path.  Ray Jr. talks to Icon Fetch about his memories of his dad in the studio, his thoughts on the “Ray” movie, and how his own daughter has a chance to carry on the legacy left by her grandfather.  Click below for the Ray Charles Jr. interview.

#21 – Roger Earl of Foghat – Last Train Home

Roger Earl of Foghat

Boogie rockers Foghat, best known for hits “Slow Ride” & “Fool For the City,” have always had their roots in the blues, but they’ve never done an entire album of blues music until now. Last Train Home is a great mix of classics and originals, all featuring the fierce playing of a well-seasoned band.  Icon Fetch talks with founding member, drummer Roger Earl about recording the new record, and the crazy story of the front-cover photo shoot for their classic LP Fool For the City.  Click below for the Roger Earl Foghat interview.

 

#20 – Peter Parcek – The Mathematics of Love

Peter Parcek

Guitarist Peter Parcek is what you might call a late bloomer.  At 60 years old, he’s just released his first national release.   Hailing from the New England area, his post-high school years were spent abroad, soaking up the British blues of Eric Clapton and Peter Green, and avoiding the Vietnam combat.  Once things calmed down, Parcek returned to the States and took jobs as a school counselor and instrument salesman.  A chance meeting with blues legend Pinetop Perkins resulted in Parcek leading Perkins’ band for awhile.  After gaining more confidence, Parcek decided to strike out on his own.  The Mathematics of Love, only his second solo album, showcases his varied style, something he calls “soul guitar.”  He gets help from another legend, Al Kooper, on several of the tracks on the album.  Click below for the Peter Parcek interview.