384 – Photographer Lisa S. Johnson – Immortal Axes – Guitars That Rock, Featuring Hendrix, Cobain, Lennon, Gilmour, Page and More

Back in 2013, photographer Lisa S. Johnson released 108 Rock Star Guitars, and it was a unique book. She photographed some of the most hallowed guitars in history from the likes of Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck, and Keith Richards. But, she went a step further, often zooming in on a worn fretboard, or flipping the guitar over to see sweat stains on the back of the body. By focusing on each guitar as a piece of art, it gave us a deeper appreciation for both the instrument, and the artist who played it.

Now, Johnson is back with another fantastic guitar book, Immortal Axes, Guitars That Rock from Princeton Architectural Press,  and she’s captured some great ones, among them, the guitar Jimi Hendrix played at Woodstock, Duane Allman’s Les Paul, Kurt Cobain’s smashed but repaired Strat, even John Lennon’s acoustic that he played during his “Bed In For Peace.” The 388, full color, hardback book is out from Princeton Architectural Press and would make a great gift for any guitar enthusiast.

We talked how Johnson tracked down many of these guitars, including one of her idols, Joan Jett. Plus, we talk Peter Frampton, who wrote the foreword, and Suzi Quatro, who penned the Afterword, and how the two are related.

More info can be found at immortalaxes.com

Seminal Albums From Buck Owens are finally back in print

Nine classic records are making their digital and CD debut

Omnivore continues their association with the Buck Owens’ Estate by reissuing a whopping nine Owens’ albums, spanning 1968-1974.  Each set comes with an essay from Owens’ biographer Randy Poe, with excerpts from the autobiography Buck ‘Em.  Also included in each booklet are photos, trade magazine ads, vintage fan club applications and other rare goodies.  This era spans the time right before and while he was a host of the popular variety show, Hee Haw.

Driven.

After immersing in these reissues, that’s the first word that comes to mind.  Buck Owens was driven like no other artist.  In 1968, he issued no less than FOUR albums, with the majority of the songs written or co-written by Owens.  He was also touring and owned his own management company and was developing other artists.  Oh, he was also a hit star on television.  Whew!

With all this activity, you might think that the quality of these recordings is sub par.  No way.  Each one of these albums has some merit, and many of them stand alongside his finest work.  Above all, you see that Buck was obsessed with how his songs did on the Country charts – if it didn’t go Number One, it was a failure.  Here’s our notes from each individual album:

Sweet Rosie Jones (1968)

Leads with “Hello Happiness, Goodbye Loneliness,” the kind of catchy song that Owens could write in his sleep.  “Sweet Rosie Jones” is a classic tale of love gone wrong, complete with a spoken last verse.  One of the few songs that Owens didn’t write here is “Swinging Doors.”  Of course done by former Buckaroo Merle Haggard.  But, Buck’s version is more subdued, and less rockin’  Another great one is “You’ll Never Miss the Water (Til the Well Runs Dry)” featuring great harmonies and steel guitar.  “Sally, Mary and Jerry” is a great take on gossip.  I like the clever use of handclaps that help bridge the different parts of “How Long Will My Baby Be Gone,”  while “Leave Me Something to Remember You By” is a great tearjerker.  Another highlight is “The Girl on Sugar Pie Lane.” The album closes with “Happy Times Are Here Again.”  

I’ve Got You on My Mind Again (1968)

Part of Owens’ signature sound was how he boosted the high frequencies, check out the way the piano sounds on the leadoff title track.  “Let the World Keep on a Turnin” features guest vocals from Buck’s son, Buddy Alan,  Another great sad one is “Don’t Let True Love Slip Away.”  Another duet is “I’ll Love You Forever and Ever,” with its signature, high energy tempo.  There are a few cringe-worthy moments – Owens is a little creepy on “Love is Me” – he just overdoes the vocals.  But, I love “Alabama, Louisiana or Maybe Tennessee.”  This also marked the first time in a long while where Owens approved background vocals, done by the legendary Jordanaires and Anita Kerr Singers.

Tall Dark Stranger (1969)

The album has a Spanish overtone with the guitar.  It’s interesting because this sounds more like a Marty Robbins record from the early Sixties than a typical Owens’ album.  The Tall Dark Stranger was first introduced on the song, “Sweet Rosie Jones.”  Owens decided to revisit this mysterious gentleman.  I like how the background vocals echo “danger” – a very classic, Western-style element.  “There’s Gotta Be Some Changes Made” has some great harmonies and pedal steel.  The finest track here is “White Satin Bed,” where Owens’ vocals really shine.  It’s a tale of a poor man who’s looking forward to lying in a casket, because it’s the first time he’s ever slept somewhere comfortable.  “Darlin,’ You Can Depend on Me” revisits the fast/slow/fast tempo changes first introduced on his hit, “Before You Go.”  Owens would try just about anything in a country song, take the waltz tempo of “Hurtin’ Like I’ve Never Hurt Before,” or the strings, brass and a large vocal ensemble of the final song, “But You Know I Love You.”  

Your Mother’s Prayer (1970)

Owen’s second foray into Gospel music, this album was also the first to not hit the Country charts, ending a seven year run.  Perhaps the overexposure of his weekly appearance on Hee Haw was taking its toll?  Despite its relative commercial disappointment, there’s still a lot of great material here.  I really like the harmonies of Owen’s original, “The Great Judgement Day.”  Earl Poole Ball contributes some great piano work, heard prominently on “That Old Time Religion,” but is sprinkled throughout the entire album.  He does an interesting take on “When the Roll is Called Up Yonder,” I like the way the steel guitar echoes the chorus, “bah, bah-bah.”  There’s some tasty fiddle that drives “That Lonesome Valley,” while “That Sunday Feeling” might as well be a secular song, it’s sung with the same fervor as his hits.  “My Savior Leads the Way” is fueled by a bouncing bassline.  Overall, a pretty solid listen. And, the booklet reprints Owen’s mom’s original prayer to him.

The Kansas City Song (1970)

The title song is a little too sugary, with a glutton of background vocals, and a goofy organ.  One by one, the original Buckaroos were exiting, and the accompaniment sounds a little less cohesive on this one. There’s more songs about places, like “(It’s a Long Way To) Londontown,” “Amsterdam,” and “The Wind Blows Every Day in Oklahoma,” but nothing really stands out.  Better is the waltz tempo of “Black Texas Dirt,” and the instrumental “Scandinavian Polka” is good fun.  Things finally catch fire on “You Can’t Make Nothin’ Out of That But Love” – Owens finally sounds energized here, and I really like the bridge where everything drops out but the drums and bass.  And the goofy minstrel number, “Full Time Daddy,” wasn’t going to help him regain any credibility.

I Wouldn’t Live in New York City (1970)

Owens continued his fascination with doing songs about places, but the title song was better than anything on his previous album.  There’s a great story about what inspired the song in the liner notes.  And, talk about authentic – he recorded his lead vocal, right there on the streets of Manhattan! (you can hear a police siren right near the end).  He chose to add sound effects to every song, adding casino sounds to “Reno Lament,” but sometimes they’re just too distracting, like the train effects on “Down n New Orleans,” or the cattle sounds on the revamped “The Kansas City Song.” He also retooled songs from previous albums – “The Wind Blows Every Day in Chicago” was actually “Oklahoma,” while “Amsterdam” became “Houston Town.” The best song is saved for last – the heartfelt “Big in Vegas” – it became Owens’ biggest song in quite some time.

In the Palm of Your Hand (1973)

His best album in several years, this record is full of great songs.  It also featured his final number one hit, the fantastic “Made in Japan,” a clever recording full of Farfisa organ and guitars that give it an Asian feel.  But, that’s just the beginning.  “Arms Full of Empty” is classic, upbeat Bakersfield goodness, while “Sweethearts in Heaven” is midtempo, driven by pedal steel.  Another good example is “You Ain’t Gonna Have Ol’ Buck to Kick Around No More” – with a title like this, things could’ve easily fallen into parody, but Owens instead plays it straight and sincere, like his classic recordings.  Everything here works, whether it’s the sad “Something’s Wrong” or the rockin’ “A Whole Lot of Somethin,’” everything is firing on all cylinders. “There Goes My Love” is another standout.

Ain’t It Amazing, Gracie (1973)

The title song is classic, upbeat Buck, complete with steel guitar and Don Rich harmonies. Some of the record plods along – “Long Hot Summer” just kinda lays there, while “She’s Had all the Dreamin’ She Can Stand” is slightly better, but “The Good Old Days (Are Here Again)” just doesn’t sound sincere.  “You’re Monkey Won’t Be Home Tonight” is decent, but there’s something missing here.  Things are a little too polished, and Owens’ voice sometimes is mixed too loud, like on “I Know That You Know That I Care.”  “When You Come Back From Nashville” does have some fine harmonies.  Actually, the best was saved for last.  “When You Get to Heaven (I’ll Be There)” is spirited and good fun.  The album is also significant for the inclusion of the original version of “The Streets of Bakersfield,” an LP cut that he’d later revisit in a duet with Dwight Yoakam.  

It’s a Monster’s Holiday (1974)

The last album featuring longtime Buckaroo, Don Rich, who would pass away from a motorcycle accident before it got released, this record is still one of the better of his latter-day Capitol releases.  Of note is the title song, which is good fun.  I’m kinda surprised this doesn’t get played around Halloween.  If it does, I’ve never heard it on the radio.  Also notable is “On the Cover of the Music City News,” a rewrite of Dr. Hook and the Medicine Show’s “On the Cover of the Rolling Stone.” There’s some good cover tunes too – he does Tom T. Hall’s “I Love” and Charley Pride’s “Kiss An Angel Good Morning” – neither outdo the original, but they help keep the album interesting.  “Great Expectations” is one of Owen’s best ballads from this period.  Rich’s death would rob Owens of the man who provided all those unique harmonies on every single one of his hit songs, not to mention his impeccable guitar playing.  Owens really never recovered after that. –Tony Peters

383 – Bob Heimall – Cover Stories Book, Featuring the Doors, Carly Simon, Jim Croce, John Lennon & More

Artwork in music is mostly an afterthought these days. A small, thumbnail photo shows up when we stream a song from our phone. But, for decades when vinyl was king, album covers played a crucial role in the success of a record. Think about what Sgt. Pepper or Led Zeppelin IV or Dark Side of the Moon would be without the packaging.

Bob Heimall was responsible for creating some of the most iconic LP art from artists like the Doors, Carly Simon, Jim Croce and John Lennon, and he showcases it in his book, Cover Stories – Tales of Rock Legends and the Albums That Made Them Famous.

He talks about taking a job with Elektra Records and almost immediately dealing with Jim Morrison and the Doors. He also tells us how he helped Carly Simon, who was a brand new artist at the time, develop her image. He also talks about having to put together albums from Jim Croce and John Lennon after both passed away.

Jefferson Starship rocks sidney

Jefferson Starship – Sidney High School – 10/24/21

Grace Slick, Marty Balin, Mickey Thomas – Jefferson Starship has had some extraordinary vocalists pass through their band.

Add Cathy Richardson to the list.

The 52-year old singer played the lead role in the off-Broadway musical, Love Janis, several years ago, then joined J. Starship back in 2008. Her voice is a force of nature.

On a rainy, Sunday night about an hour north of Dayton, I was not sure what to expect here.

The band opened with “Find Your Way Back,” and I swear it sounded like Thomas was up there singing. I’m not talking about direct copying, but Richardson just nailed it. She seems to know just what to give each song. She was tender on “Miracles,” yet boisterous on “Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now.”

David Freiberg, the remaining founding member, is 31 years Richardson’s senior (!), but was absolutely amazing as well. His role in the band has changed over the years, sometimes playing bass or keyboards in the past, but here he sang.

And boy did he sing.

The band paid tribute to those great Balin ballads, like “Count on Me,” “With Your Love,” and “Runaway,” and the 83-year old sang every one of them. And those songs aren’t easy to pull off.

Jefferson Starship is touring in support of an album they released last year called Mother of the Sun, and the pair of tunes, “It’s About Time” (sung by Richardson, and co-written by Grace Slick), and “Setting Sun” (written and sung by Freiberg), fit in excellently with the band’s older material.

Guitarist Jude Gold gave a nod to the Airplane days, taking a solo performance of “Embroynic Journey” (which originally appeared on the album Surrealistic Pillow).

Freiberg sang the rocker “Jane,” which he co-wrote, before they unleashed their show-stopper – Jefferson Airplane’s “Somebody to Love” – and Richardson just let her voice loose on their one. Just wow.

Even though the band has gone through multiple lineup changes, they are obviously in the capable hands of the stellar Richardson and the ageless Freiberg (who’s FIVE years older than Mick Jagger).

I was thoroughly impressed. This incarnation of Jefferson Starship is the real deal. —Tony Peters

382 – Cathy Richardson & David Freiberg of Jefferson Starship – New album, Mother of the sun, Tour

Jefferson Starship has gone through a lot of changes over the years. First, rising from the ashes of the previous Jefferson Airplane, it was a vehicle for Paul Kantner, Grace Slick and David Freiberg.

Over the years, and numerous lineup changes, the band scored many hits, like “Miracles,” “Count on Me,” “Find Your Way Back,” and “Jane,” which was co-written by Freiberg.

The band is currently out on the road in support of their brand new album called Mother of the Sun, and from the band, we welcome David Freiberg and vocalist Cathy Richardson.

We talk the new album, which features several nods to the past, including a brand new song, “It’s About Time,” co-written with Slick, and another song written by former vocalist Marty Balin. The album also features a live version of “Embryonic Journey,” a song dating all the way back to the Jefferson Airplane days.

381 – Chris Hillman – Time Between: Autobiography is Now an Audiobook and Paperback

Chris Hillman is one of the unsung heroes of popular music. Starting out as bassist for the Byrds, the band was part of the American answer to the Beatles, electrifying the lyrics of Bob Dylan on “Mr. Tambourine Man,” but showing they could write trailblazing material of their own in songs like “Eight Miles High.”

Hillman introduced Gram Parsons to the band and their all-country Sweetheart of the Rodeo was the result. Hillman followed Parsons to the Flying Burrito Brothers, also took part in the Stephen Stills-led Manassas, recorded some solo records and eventually found surprising success on the country charts with the Desert Rose Band in the 1980’s. Hillman chronicled all of this in Time Between – My Life as a Byrd, Burrito Brother and Beyond from BMG Books, now out in paperback, and as an audio book, narrated by the author, from Random House Audio.

He talks about recording little snippets of songs he was involved in exclusively for the audio book. He also tells us about a pivotal session he did with Hugh Masekela that helped give him confidence as a musician. And, he discusses the anniversary concert for Sweetheart of the Rodeo.

380 – Luther Russell – Archival album, The Bootheels & Jakob Dylan

Before the mid-90’s success of the Wallflowers, Jakob Dylan and Tobi Miller were part of the Bootheels, a quartet led by bassist/vocalist Luther Russell. Although the group’s time was short – they only played a handful of gigs, they left behind some incendiary music – documented in 1988: the Original Demos from Omnivore Recordings.

Russell later formed the Freewheelers before joining Big Star drummer Jody Stephens in the Those Pretty Wrongs. Bootheel drummer Aaron Brooks would later work with Moby, Lana Del Rey and others.

We chat with Russell about the crazy circumstances that led to the forming of the band, how their rehearsal space evolved into a small, but packed-out concert venue, and why the Replacements were such a huge influence on the group. He also talks about upcoming projects, both solo and with Stephens.

379 – Dar Williams – New album, I’ll Meet You Here

Dar Williams - credit Ebru Yildiz

New England singer/songwriter Dar Williams has been putting out music for over 30 years. She’s played with Mary Chapin Carpenter, Ani DiFranco and Joan Baez, among others.  She’s also written several books, including What I Found in a Thousand Towns: A Traveling Musician’s Guide to Rebuilding America’s Communities – One Coffee Shop, Dog Run, and Open Mic Night At a Time.

Her latest album is her first in six years, called I’ll Meet You Here. We talk about the inspiration for many of the songs on the record, including “You Give It All Away,” which deals with the current state of streaming music, and “Today and Every Day,” which talks about the little things we can do save the world. She also revisits a song from her very first album, “You’re Aging Well.”

378 – Tito Jackson – New album, Under Your Spell, & History of jackson 5

Tito Jackson is part of one of the most talented musical families in history, the Jacksons. With the Jackson 5, their first four singles for Motown Records all went to Number One, including “I Want You Back,” and “ABC.”

After leaving Motown in the mid-Seventies, Tito began showcasing his multiple talents, writing songs, playing guitar and keyboards on many albums, especially those of his family members.  But, it wasn’t until 2017 that he put out his first solo record, Tito Time. 

Now he’s back with a brand new project, Under Your Spell, and it’s star-studded affair, with contributions from Stevie Wonder, Joe Bonamassa, George Benson, Eddie Levert and more.

We talk with Jackson about the project and how he coaxed legendary producers Gamble and Huff out of retirement to pen one of the songs on the new record. He also tells the story of how, as a young boy, he broke a string on his father’s guitar – an act that got the ball rolling for the Jackson 5.

Vince Guaraldi Trio – A Boy Named Charlie Brown (Target exclusive)

Vince Guaraldi Trio – A Boy Named Charlie Brown (Craft Recordings)

The album that started it all – reissued on “grass green” vinyl!

The most famous jazz instrumental of all time isn’t by Miles Davis or John Coltrane, it’s from an unassuming pianist and his trio. Vince Guaraldi composed “Linus and Lucy” in 1964 for A Boy Named Charlie Brown, a television special that amazingly never got released. Yet, the album introduced us to this rollicking piece of music, which has become synonymous with the Peanuts’ franchise. It also paved the way for A Charlie Brown Christmas, one of the most famous holiday albums ever recorded, which came out the following year.

Craft Recordings has just issued a “Baseball Card Edition” on “grass green vinyl” (referring to the front cover of Charlie Brown, sitting on top of the pitcher’s mound). This version is exclusively available at Target stores, and comes with a sheet of eight baseball cards, depicting the various Peanuts characters. The card backs are especially fun, revealing that Charlie Brown has never won a game, Lucy’s fielding average is .000, and Snoopy’s favorite sandwich is a Hero.

The music, outside the aforementioned “Linus and Lucy,” is less familiar, but just as enjoyable. Guaraldi had a way of creating melodies that are friendly and fun – something often elusive in the jazz genre.

“Oh Good Grief” sets the mood, with its walking bass of Monty Budwig, followed by the bossa nova of “Pebble Beach” (which reminds me of the old standard, “That Old Feeling”). Guaraldi is all over the piano here, but still manages to not sound “busy.” The Charlie Brown character seems to do a great deal of contemplating and “Happiness Is” is perfect for his self reflection. “Schroeder” is clever in referencing his idol, Beethoven, while the gentle “Charlie Brown Theme” gently swings.

Side two opens with “Linus and Lucy” – it’s funny, it’s called A Boy Named Charlie Brown, but in typical “Charlie Brown fashion,” others steal the show. Colin Bailey’s ride cymbal really jumps out on this vinyl release.

“Blue Charlie Brown” is the longest piece on the album, clocking in at over seven minutes. Guaraldi hits some “blue” notes, and both Budwig and Bailey stretch out here, really catching a groove. “Baseball Theme” is once again playful, perfect accompaniment for the kids’ game, and their shenanigans. The album closes with “Frieda (With the Naturally Curly Hair).” Here, Guaraldi lets his playing swirl behind the swinging rhythm section.

Craft Recordings always go above and beyond on their vinyl reissues, and this is no exception. Mastered specifically for vinyl from the analog tapes by Kevin Gray at Cohearent Audio. The biggest difference is the double bass really jumps out on this version, giving a fat, warm bottom end.

Just as he did with A Charlie Brown Christmas, Vince Guaraldi creates instrumentals that are warm and inviting. You don’t have to be a fan of jazz to enjoy this. In fact, that’s kind of the point here. It’s jazz for people that don’t like jazz. Yet, this also isn’t a dumbed down version of the genre either. And that’s Guaraldi’s gift, it’s music for everyone. If you’re a fan of the Peanuts’ specials (and who isn’t???), A Boy Named Charlie Brown should be in your collection. The special green vinyl and baseball cards make it even more fun. —Tony Peters

Pin It on Pinterest