#16 – Krokus – Hoodoo

Krokus - Hoodoo

Swiss hard rockers Krokus have returned with their original lineup for the first time in 25 years.  The band is best known in the US for hits like “Screaming in the Night” and “Stayed Awake All Night.”  They’ve just released their new disc Hoodoo, that harkens back to their early 80’s heyday.  Icon Fetch talks with lead singer Marc Storace about what led to the reunion, how they approached recording the new CD, and how they still love filming videos with hot chicks in them.  Click below for the Marc Storace Krokus interview.

 

#15 – Guy Sebastian – I Like It Like That

Guy Sebastian

Guy Sebastian won the inaugural season of Australian Idol and parlayed that into five top ten albums in his native country, including “The Memphis Album” that featured legendary guitarist Steve Cropper.  Now Guy has his sights set on the US, with his first domestic release “I Like It Like That.” He gets help on the new disc from John Mayer, who plays guitar on three tracks and former American Idol winner Jordin Sparks, who duets with him on “Art of Love.”  Icon Fetch talks with the soul singer from “down under.”  Click below for the Guy Sebastian interview.

#14 – Sam Cutler – You Can’t Always Get What You Want

You Can't Always Get What You Want by Sam Cutler

Sam Cutler was the tour manager for the Rolling Stones during their 1969 tour that ended in the Altamont concert tragedy.  He later became the road manager for the Grateful Dead, helping them get out of debt and on their way to being one of the top-grossing bands in the world.  Sam is the author of a new book called “You Can’t Always Get What You Want: My Life With the Rolling Stones, Grateful Dead and Other Wonderful Reprobates.”  Icon Fetch talks with Cutler from his home in Australia, where he gives some of his thoughts on what went wrong during the Altamont free concert, and  shares memories of the Dead and Janis Joplin.  You can download an App for your I-phone and hear Sam read the book by clicking here. Click below for the Sam Cutler interview.

Classic Album – Rush – Moving Pictures (CD review)

Rush – Moving Pictures – CD review

No band has based their entire career more on one album than Rush.   Not only their best album, Moving Pictures is the only one worth listening to all the way through.  First of all, it’s their best collection of songs, beginning with their crowning achievement, “Tom Sawyer,” a perfect blend of hard rock and the progressive metal they had been tinkering with over their previous albums.  “Red Barchetta” shows off drummer Neil Peart’s lyrcism.

And, “Limelight” ranks as one of the best “playing in a band songs.”  Even though leader Geddy Lee played a great deal of keyboards on the record, it’s still not as dominant a force as it would become on future releases.  And the production here is meaty, the band sounds real for the last time.  With their next album, Signals, and beyond, the band would favor a slick, over-produced sound that made the band feel cold and robotic. Grace Under Pressure, Hold Your Fire, Power Windows, Roll the Bones; these albums are all interchangeable.  There’s no progression or maturing, it’s the same song written over and over.  Yet, because of the success of Moving Pictures, rabid Rush fans bought these and subsequent releases ad nauseum. –Tony Peters

Classic Album – AC/DC – Back in Black (CD review)


Back in Black – AC/DC – CD review –

A perfect storm of an album, Back in Black is an uncanny blend of metal and pop, and it still sells as if it were brand new.  Recorded right after the death of original singer Bon Scott, this could have been a real downer.  Instead, the remaining members regrouped with singer Brian Johnson and turned in the most inspired album of their career.

Johnson adds a level of toughness that was lacking with Scott.  He screams, but never averts to the hysterionics of other heavy metal singers.  The songs are propelled by simple, repetitive hypnotic guitar riffs and an incessant backbeat that’s reminiscent of the early rock of the 50’s. The same goes for the guitar work, many of the solos are blistering, yet they never overstay their welcome.  And, the production, by Robert “Mutt” Lange, who would later go onto even bigger success with Def Leppard and Shania Twain, is equally important.  The guitars are just gritty enough and the drums are upfront so you can feel the kick drum.

The album opens with the ominous “Hells Bells,” which starts out slow and picks up speed.  “You Shook Me All Night Long” proved that there could be metal for the masses.  Above all, this album does the impossible, it makes heavy metal that’s actually danceable.  This is body music, and whether that’s manifested in banging your head, shaking your ass, or swinging from a pole, it will get you one way or another. –Tony Peters

Classic Album – Pink Floyd – Dark Side of the Moon (CD review)

Pink Floyd – Dark Side of the Moon – CD review

One of the biggest selling albums of all-time is also one of the strangest.  An LP based largely on themes of isolation and paranoia, the Dark Side of the Moon nevertheless continues to strike a chord with record buyers.  Despite the chilly lyrics, this is a very human album.

Everyday sounds morph into rhythms of several songs: the heartbeat and clocks that begin “Time,” and the cash register at the beginning of “Money,” add a very real element to these otherwise detached songs.  The intermittent random talking over the tracks also adds an element making the listener seem closer to the music.  The quality of the production cannot be overlooked.  Produced by the band and engineered by Alan Parsons, Dark Side is pristine, and despite its heavy reliance on keyboards, still doesn’t sound dated.

Even more amazing is the lack of any image;  the cover contained no text and no mention of Pink Floyd or the songs listed within, only a prism illustration, adding to the eerie quality of the album.  Pink Floyd would go on to record more heady music, but this is their shining moment.  –Tony Peters

Classic Album – Wings – Wings Over America (CD review)

Paul McCartney & Wings – Wings Over America (1976) – CD review

Paul McCartney has always been a perfectionist; it’s certainly one of the factors that contributed to the breakup of the Beatles.  And, while his 70’s hits with Wings are great, many of them sound stuffy, as if they’ve been cooked too long.  That’s what makes Wings Over America such a revelation.

McCartney is out of the studio and into a live band setting where things can really heat up, and he doesn’t have a chance to add overdub after overdub.  The Wings’ hits sound more lively; “Jet,” “Silly Love Songs,” and “Let “Em In” all benefit from the concert setting.  Paul had a tendency to play most of the instruments on his records.  Here, he has to put his faith in the band, and they deliver.  Guitarist Jimmy McCulloch is a real highlight, injecting some slinky solos into Paul’s songs.

The opening medley of “Venus & Mars / Rockshow / Jet” is as breathtaking a performance as Paul has ever done.  He’d not yet made peace with his Beatles past, so the Fab Four songs are minimal; mostly leaning toward ballads like “Yesterday,” and “the Long & Winding Road.”  Paul used this as a proving ground for his current band to be taken seriously, and he pulls it off.  Even the album cuts, like “Time to Hide” and “Beware My Love” are enjoyable.  A triple-LP set when it was first issued, Wings Over America stands as a pinnacle of McCartney’s solo work.  –Tony Peters

Classic Album – Mandy Moore – Coverage (CD review)

Mandy Moore – Coverage (2003) – CD review

There have been some bizarre cover albums over the years, and this is certainly one of them.  Coverage finds pop princess Mandy Moore tackling a music geek’s Ipod playlist.  The strangest thing about it is that she actually pulls it off.

The disc opens with her take on “Senses Working Overtime,” for shock purposes, I’m sure.  Moore doing alternative stalwarts XTC…seems like a good chuckle.  Yet, Moore turns this classic staple of college radio into the pop gem it probably should have been, if only it’s original lead singer (Andy Partridge) could actually sing.  She handles other obscure songs by the Waterboys and Joan Armatrading equally well.

The rest of the album is made up of brainy hits by classic rock icons like Joni Mitchell and Elton John.  “Anticipation” from Carly Simon is given a twangy edge, while Moore actually matches the ethereal feel of Todd Rundgren’s original of “Can We Still Be Friends.”  A key here is that there are several opportunities to over-sing, but Moore never takes the bait.  She simply shows that she’s got a great voice and a pretty good intuition for offering the right approach to these hallowed songs.

This should have been a laugh-fest.  Instead, it’s a fun listen.

Coverage was supposed to have been her breakthrough into the serious adult market.  She’s since released two albums of totally original music, but has been met with the same public indifference.  Too bad, maybe they should put on this disc and lighten up a little. –Tony Peters

Bettye Lavette – Interpretations (CD review)

Bettye LaVette – Interpretations: The British Rock Songbook (Anti) – CD review –

Bettye is like a fine wine – she had to get good and old before people would start to enjoy her.  The singer, now aged 64, is having the biggest success of her career.  A video of her performing the Who’s “Love Reign O’er Me” at the Kennedy Center Honors became a Youtube sensation.  LaVette didn’t just sing the song, she reinvented it and made it her own.  Interpretations: The British Rock Songbook asks the question: “can she do it again”?

The answer is a resounding “yes”!  Interpretations is an excellent name for this collection, because of the 13 tracks, she rarely plays the arrangements straight.  If you don’t look at the track listing, you might find yourself going through half of the song before recognizing it.  To say that she breathes new life into these tired old rock classics is an understatement.  Bettye recreates these songs, often times singing behind the melody, turning every one of these into spine chilling soul classics.

The arrangements are sparse: slinky Stax-infused guitars, Hi-records strings and Lavette’s gravelly but powerful voice cutting through.  “It Don’t Come Easy” the jangly Ringo Starr song, is transformed into an acoustic-based blues, “Maybe I’m Amazed” becomes a sermon for her to sing from the pulpit, even Zeppelin’s “All My Love” becomes a soul shouter.  Plenty of artists have tried similar projects and wind up sounding like bad karaoke.  LaVette not only pulls it off, she begs the question: “where the hell has she been all these years”?  — Tony Peters

Scorpions – Sting in the Tail (CD review)

Scorpions – Sting In The Tail (Universal) – CD review –

Yes, there is still venom left in the band from Hannover, Germany.  The Scorpions have decided to call it quits after their current tour and if Sting in the Tail (Universal) is indeed their final studio record, (17th to be exact) it is worth the purchase.  This album of 12 songs could have easily fallen somewhere between their best known album of the 80’s “Love At First Sting” and their most commercially successful foyer into the 90’s “Crazy World”.

Beginning with the current radio hit “Raised On Rock”, which has a definite “Rock You Like A Hurricane” feel, guitarists Rudolf Schenker and Matthias Jabs deliver crunchy riffs and some solid solos to please any rocker.  62 year old Klaus Meine (yes that’s right, he’s 62), sounds in great vocal form on tracks like “Slave Me”, “Rock Zone”, and “Turn You On”. “The Good Die Young”, featuring the Finnish symphonic metal singer Tarja Turunen, is the weakest of the bunch, suffering from some less than stellar verses lyrically, but rebounds during the chorus.

There are even a few ballads, which the Scorpions always did well, (ala “Still Loving You” and “Winds Of Change”) in the songs, “Lorelei” and the album closer “The Best Is Yet To Come”. The lyrics are at times, unsophisticated.  But, that’s not the reason anyone has ever listened to the Scorpions, right?  The band have stated that the reason for their impending retirement is that “they want to end the Scorpions’ extraordinary career on a high note”, and they’ve done a pretty decent job with this CD. They are currently on the road in the U.S. and Canada through the end of August, so get out there and GET YOUR STING AND BLACKOUT before these guys call it quits. More info at the-scorpions.com. Allen Roenker

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