Rayburn – The Living End (review)

Rayburn – The Living End (Excited States Entertainment) review

Get ready to reconnect with the loud function on your volume knob

There was a time when rock music was fun, when people weren’t ashamed of being good musicians, and when people weren’t afraid to write catchy songs.  Rayburn recalls the best of those times with the release of their new album, The Living End.

The disc begins with “At the Gate,” a hybrid of Led Zeppelin and Kansas with a harmony-infused chorus.  “Malachi” is a furious rocker with a killer repetitive riff and an explosive chorus.  The combination of heavy guitar and organ recall what we loved about bands like Deep Purple.

The moody “Jealous Mistress” has a psychedelic feel, while the bluesy “Deep in Blue” has a Tin Pan Alley vibe.   “Almost Home” is the album’s real surprise, a radio-ready smash, if only there was good rock radio around to play it.

“Madness” starts quiet but builds to a big ending, complete with strings. The funky “I Still Believe” features a great guitar solo at the end that recalls Steve Howe’s finest moments with Yes. The disc ends with the yearning “Journey” and then the short, acoustic “Not Going Back.”

Vocalist Danny Archer has a clear voice, capable of a lot of different emotions, yet throughout he only gives the songs what they need, never over-singing (a common problem in this genre).

The Rayburn guys are basically old-school Prog Rockers (one peek at their album cover and you get that).  But, unlike so many of their contemporaries, the band understands the art of writing good melodies, and it’s that emphasis, instead of showing off, that really elevates these tracks.

Melodic hooks, excellent playing, and some nods to the past – The Living End is hopefully not the last time we hear from Rayburn.  —Tony Peters