Craft Recordings Has an Impressive Lineup For Record Store Day (review)

Highlights include Bill Evans, Collective Soul, Filter, and the Orca Soundtrack!

With the the return of vinyl, Craft Recordings have distanced themselves from the pack, both in attention to detail and diversity. Their 2024 offerings for Record Store Day are no exception.

Bill Evans – Everybody Digs Bill Evans 

Certainly the crown jewel of the four releases, Everybody Digs Bill Evans is not just one of the pianist’s best LPs, it’s also considered one of the greatest jazz albums of all time.  Widely available only in stereo, Craft has tracked down the rare, mono mix, and it’s available in limited quantities for Record Store Day. 

The mono mix gives everything a unique feel – more cohesive.  The bass is more felt than heard.  There’s also subtle differences in a few of the songs, not different takes, but edited differently.  Right away with the first track, “Minority,” there’s a drum part at the beginning that is not present on the common, stereo mix.  And, oddly, “Night and Day” is actually shorter.

Featuring Sam Jones on bass and Philly Jo Jones on drums, Everybody Digs was Evans’ second album as bandleader, recorded the same year that Evans participated in the groundbreaking Kind of Blue sessions for Miles Davis.  

The album jacket is also a curiosity – featuring praise from Davis, George Shearing, Ahmad Jamal and Cannonball Adderley on the front cover.  This edition was transferred totally in analog and features a heavy-grade, tip on jacket.

Collective Soul – Dosage

This marks the first-ever vinyl release of the platinum, fourth album from Collective Soul.  Stylistically a shift from their previous releases, there was an emphasis on more intricate arrangements, loops, and a heavier use of strings.  

With all the success Collective Soul had achieved on Rock radio, especially with their second album, and singles like “December,” “The World I Know,” and “Gel,” you could say that the band was getting over-exposed.  Which is a shame, because Dosage may be their best album.  

The record opens with the trippy, “Tremble For My Beloved,” which reminds me of “Zoo Station” by U2 in the looping percussion and slashing guitars. That’s followed by the album’s first single, “Heavy,” which set a record (at the time) for most weeks at #1 (15).  

“No More, No Less” is driven by a funky bassline and features a great chorus and guitar solo.  The strings really elevate the ballad, “Needs,” where Ed Rowland shows off his falsetto.  Side one ends with the Sgt. Pepper-sounding, “Dandy Life,” giving lead guitarist Ross Childress a chance to sing. 

I’ve never had an album with a shorter run-out.  The last note of “Dandy” hits, and the needle is immediately is at the end of the record.  The reason is perhaps that this album, clocking in at over 50 minutes, is pretty long for a single, vinyl record.

Side two starts with one of the band’s best singles, the shimmering, acoustic-led, “Run.”  Other highlights include the psychedelic-tinged “Compliment,” and the piano-infused ballad, “Not the One.”  After the final track, “Crown,” there’s a pause, then a hidden track, “She Said,” which was originally included on the Scream 2 Soundtrack.  Honestly, you can really hear a drop in fidelity as I think they’re really squeezing about as much audio as possible in the grooves.

This special, Record Store Day release is pressed on translucent, lemonade vinyl, and includes an inner sleeve with all the lyrics.

While Dosage came at a point where the rock audience may have grown weary of them, giving it a listen 25 years later, it’s an excellent collection of songs, and possibly their best album ever.

Orca Soundtrack (Varese Sarabrande)

Although an obvious attempt to cash in on the success of Jaws by upping the deep sea villain from a shark to a killer whale, and failing badly (the film has a measly 9 percent approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes).  The fact is, the film’s score is pretty interesting. The movie music was helmed by Ennio Morricone, who is best known for his spaghetti western soundtracks, including his most famous composition, “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly.”  

The soundtrack starts with the majestic “Orca (Main Title),” then shifts to ominous foreboding with “Early Ices,” then sad, wordless singing on “Intermezzo.”  Things heat up with “The Fight, the Victory, the Death,” which has a classic, slasher film feel, with cutting sound effects, before giving way to the very odd, lounge feel of “A Ball at Home,” the only track that truly feels dated and out of place.

Side two opens with the lonesome oboe of “Nocturne For a Remorse,” then “Attack and Mistake,” which does have a Jaws’ feel to it, with the deep, brooding strings.  Things close with the majestic, “Orca Finale (End Titles).”  

The soundtrack is making its North American debut on vinyl in a “blood in the water” colored edition.  The set also includes a fold out movie poster (way cool!).

The soundtrack itself sounds fantastic – jumping out of the speakers. If you’re a fan of classic film music, check this one out.

Filter – The Very Best of Things (1995-2008)

First time on vinyl, this collection contains material from Richard Patrick and Co’s first four albums, plus songs only available on movie soundtracks.  Several tracks are the hard-to-find single edits.  

The set opens with the band’s smash debut 1995 single, “Hey Man, Nice Shot,” then weaves through 1999’s “Welcome to the Fold,” and then a pair of soundtrack-only songs, “Jurassitol“ from The Crow: City of Angels, and “(Can’t You) Trip Like I Do” from Spawn: The Album, featuring the Crystal Method.

Side two opens with the surprise ballad, “Take a Picture.”  The collection isn’t sequenced chronologically, and that makes for a more interesting listen.  One surprise is the odd cover of the Three Dog Night hit, “One,” off The X Files.

Pressed on mercury swirl vinyl, it will not only sound good, it will look super cool on your turntable as well. –Tony Peters