Tag Archives: British Rock

#297 – Shel Talmy – The Creation, The Kinks & the Who

Shel Talmy with the Who
Producer Shel Talmy (center), flanked by the Who’s Keith Moon (left) and Pete Townshend (right).

He helped define the sound of early Sixties’ British rock

The name Shel Talmy may not be immediately recognizable, unless you’re a liner note junkie.  But, you’ve certainly heard his work.  Talmy is responsible for producing all of the early singles for the Kinks including “You Really Got Me,” “All Day and All the Night,” and “Sunny Afternoon.”

He also went on to do the same for the Who, with “I Can’t Explain,” “My Generation” and “Anyway Anyhow Anywhere.”  “Friday on My Mind” by the Easybeats is another credit.

But, probably the band he’s most proud of is one that didn’t make it.  The Creation had everything, catchy songs, a flashy guitarist in Eddie Phillips, an incendiary live show, yet they never even made a dent in the US charts.

The Numero Group is issuing Action Painting, a 2-disc set bringing together everything this seminal band put to tape, including some brand new stereo mixes overseen by Talmy, plus alternate takes, and an exhaustive booklet with multiple essays, session notes, and a treasure trove of pictures – it’s an impressive collection for any fan of mid-Sixties British rock.

We talk to Talmy about the high hopes he had for them, and why they never lived up to his lofty expectations.  We also touch on his work with the Kinks, the Who and the Easybeats.

#207 – John Mayall – A Special Life

He’s been called the Godfather of British blues – John Mayall – and he’s been at it more than 50 years.  His Bluesbreakers band acted as a launching pad for some of the greatest musicians of all time –  Eric Clapton, Peter Green, and Mick Taylor all spent time honing their chops in his band.   Mayall, who has never stopped touring and assembling stellar bands, is back with his first new studio record in five years, A Special Life on Forty Below Records.  He’s released somewhere in the ballpark of 60 albums, but this one is still full of vitality.  We talk the recording of his new record, how he first got interested in the blues, and what made The Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton so special.